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Be greater than your allergies

Be greater than your allergies

PUT YOUR ALLERGY IQ TO THE TEST

Provided by The Weather Channel

How much do you really know about allergies? Take this quiz to put your knowledge to the test.

Image courtesy of Thinkstock

FALSE!

Allergens play by their own set of rules. As your body grows and matures, your reactions to allergens may change. Or at least that could be your perception—especially if you have lived in different locations. It’s all about how your unique body chemistry reacts to its environment.

“Once you’re in your adult life, you can move around and have different exposures,” which can affect your symptoms, Dr. James Sublett, president-elect of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, explained. Your reactions could even change in small radiuses—for example, moving down the street.

“You may be living in an environment where there are really high levels [of allergens], you can literally move next door and have less exposure and do better,” he said. “Or the opposite, you can move next door or down the block and have more exposures. Your level of exposure and what you’re allergic to has a lot to do with this.”

The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology echoes Dr. Sublett on this matter. “Pollen, mold and grasses may differ from one location to another, but the allergens that trigger a reaction may follow you wherever you go,” they write on their website. “Additionally, if you relocate to another region, you may be exposed to a new set of allergy triggers.”1

Source:
1. American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology

Image courtesy of Thinkstock

Image courtesy of Thinkstock

FALSE!

Allergens play by their own set of rules. As your body grows and matures, your reactions to allergens may change. Or at least that could be your perception—especially if you have lived in different locations. It’s all about how your unique body chemistry reacts to its environment.

“Once you’re in your adult life, you can move around and have different exposures,” which can affect your symptoms, Dr. James Sublett, president-elect of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, explained. Your reactions could even change in small radiuses—for example, moving down the street.

“You may be living in an environment where there are really high levels [of allergens], you can literally move next door and have less exposure and do better,” he said. “Or the opposite, you can move next door or down the block and have more exposures. Your level of exposure and what you’re allergic to has a lot to do with this.”

The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology echoes Dr. Sublett on this matter. “Pollen, mold and grasses may differ from one location to another, but the allergens that trigger a reaction may follow you wherever you go,” they write on their website. “Additionally, if you relocate to another region, you may be exposed to a new set of allergy triggers.”1

Source:
1. American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology

Image courtesy of Thinkstock