Man reading book

NEWS SOURCE

Be greater than your allergies

Be greater than your allergies

Allergies

5 Allergy Myths

RAGWEED ALLERGY.
IT’S SOMETHING TO SNEEZE ABOUT.

Meet ragweed. Actually, you may have already met because it’s a predominant culprit of fall allergies. 75% of Americans who are allergic to pollen-producing plants are allergic to it.3 It grows just about everywhere in the United States—in fields, vacant lots, roadsides, and more than likely, right in your own backyard.

Each weed alone produces up to one billion pollen grains.1 That’s a lot of pollen. Symptoms can include sneezing, runny and stuffy nose, hives, scratchy nose and throat, and itchy, watery eyes.2

HOW TO KEEP A RAGWEED ALLERGY UNDER CONTROL

Want to feel better? Minimize your exposure to ragweed pollen indoors and out.

 

WASH YOUR HANDS

Pollen is sticky and can stay on your hands when you touch something while you’re outside, or even stick to your pet, if it’s been outside.2

 

 

 

WEAR A DUST MASK

Like the one’s carpenters use (found in hardware stores) when you need to do outdoor tasks, such as cutting the grass or raking leaves.2

 

 

 

CLEAN AND REPLACE FILTERS OFTEN

Such as those for your furnace and air conditioner. Use HEPA filters, which can remove at least 99% of pollen, as well as animal dander, dust, and other particles.2

 

 

 

LIMIT YOUR TIME OUTDOORS

Check your pollen forecast and if ragweed counts are high, try to stay indoors or plan outdoor activities around peak pollen times.2

 

 

CHOOSE YOUR VACATION WISELY

When you take a vacation, avoid going to places during seasons that have high ragweed pollen counts.2 Check out the Weather Channel Allergy Forecast created in partnership with FLONASE®.

 

These tips can make a big difference in helping ease the sneezing, runny nose and other annoying symptoms that come with ragweed allergies. Ragweed may be everywhere, but it shouldn’t stop you from getting the most out of your day.

 

Sources : 

1. Ragweed Allergy. (n.d.). Retrieved August 12, 2015, from http://asthmaandallergies.org/asthma-allergies/ragweed-allergy/

2. Ragweed Allergy. (2015, January 13). Retrieved August 12, 2015, from http://acaai.org/allergies/types/ragweed-allergy

3. Ragweed Allergy. (n.d.). Retrieved August 12, 2015, from https://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=19&cont=267