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FLONASE NASAL SPRAYS VS ZYRTEC

Not all over-the-counter (OTC) allergy medicines are created equal. Single-ingredient oral antihistamines don't relieve nasal congestion, and some, like Zyrtec, may even cause drowsiness. FLONASE nasal sprays are non-drowsy, anti-inflammatory allergy relief nasal sprays that provide more complete relief* than a single-ingredient antihistamine. Here’s how FLONASE stacks up against oral antihistamines, like Zyrtec.

FLONASE DOES MORE

Antihistamines only block histamine—just 1 of the many allergic substances your immune system releases when you’re exposed to an allergen.1 However, FLONASE works differently to help block 6 key allergic substances,** including histamine.

NON-DROWSY ALLERGY RELIEF

A known side effect of certain antihistamines like Zyrtec is drowsiness. This may affect your ability to perform everyday tasks, like driving or operating heavy machinery.2 Not only are FLONASE nasal sprays non-drowsy—they also provide more complete relief than most allergy pills.*

*vs single­-ingredient antihistamines that do not treat nasal congestion.
**Mechanism vs most over-the-counter (OTC) allergy pills. FLONASE nasal sprays act on multiple inflammatory substances (histamine, prostaglandins, cytokines, tryptases, chemokines, and leukotrienes). The exact number and precise mechanism are unknown.

COMPARE FLONASE AND ZYRTEC FOR ALLERGY RELIEF

FLONASE Nasal Sprays
Single-Ingredient Zyrtec

Relieves nasal congestion*

Indicated to relieve itchy, watery eyes

Non-drowsy

Relieves itchy nose,
runny nose, and sneezing

Available without prescription

Offers more complete relief* than
single-ingredient antihistamines

Administered in your nose at the source of your allergies

Please see specific products for full labeling information. Use only as directed.

Click below to learn more about FLONASE nasal sprays and discover which is right for you.

*Mechanism vs most OTC allergy pills. FLONASE nasal sprays act on multiple inflammatory substances (histamine, prostaglandins, cytokines, tryptases, chemokines, and leukotrienes). The exact number and precise mechanism are unknown.
†Indicated to relieve itchy, watery eyes in children 12 years of age and older.

Sources:

  1. CDC. (2011, February 02). Allergies. Retrieved May 18, 2017, from https://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/ToolsTemplates/EntertainmentEd/Tips/Allergies.html
  2. Mayo Clinic Staff. (2016, November 22). Allergies: Symptoms and Causes. Retrieved May 18, 2017, from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/allergies/symptoms-causes/dxc-20270197
  3. Pongdee, T. (n.d.). Prevention of allergies and asthma in children TTR | AAAAI. Retrieved May 18, 2017, from https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/allergy-library/prevention-of-allergies-and-asthma-in-children