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UNDERSTANDING

ALLERGIES

Be greater than your allergies

Be greater than your allergies

COMMON ALLERGY TRIGGERS

 

People are affected by all kinds of allergens. Some of us need to avoid pollen and dust; others can’t be around dogs or cats. But no matter what you’re allergic to, allergy symptoms can interfere with daily activities and reduce your quality of life. 

Click below to learn more about each type of allergen.

 

MOLD ALLERGIES

Mold spores are in the air—everywhere. Inside, mold is at home in moist, dark places—like basements, bathrooms, and behind kitchen appliances—circulating via heating and air-conditioning systems. Outside, mold thrives in the woods, on fallen leaves and dead plants in the garden, and even on some grains and grasses.1

TYPES OF MOLD THAT CAN CAUSE ALLERGIES

BLACK MOLD

This type of mold tends to grow on building materials, like fiberboard and gypsum board, and on paper, dust, and lint. Black mold growth is a result of excessive moisture from extreme humidity, flooding, or other types of water damage.2

SNOW MOLD

As the snow begins to melt in the spring and the ground warms up, the conditions become perfect for snow mold’s fungal spores to thrive. Snow mold comes in 2 varieties—grey and pink—and both can bring on nasal allergy symptoms.3

LEAF MOLD

Piles of rotting leaves provide the ideal conditions for mold to thrive. And unlike pollen, which is killed with the first frost, leaf mold goes dormant in the winter but begins growing as soon as the weather warms up in the spring.4

MOLD ALLERGY SYMPTOMS

Mold allergies can affect us all year long and bring on allergy symptoms like nasal congestion, sneezing, runny nose, itchy nose, and itchy, watery eyes.

MOLD ALLERGY TREATMENTS

Mold is tough to avoid because we’re exposed to it both indoors and outdoors. Find out how getting comfortable with allergy sprays can help you treat your mold allergy no matter where you are.

 

Sources:

1. US Environmental Protection Agency. Mold and moisture: a brief guide to mold, moisture, and your home. http://www.epa.gov/mold/pdfs/moldguide.pdf. Accessed August 1, 2018.
 

2. CDC.gov. Facts about Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds. http://www.cdc.gov/mold/stachy.htm. Updated September 18, 2012. Page accessed August 1, 2018.
 

3. The Lowdown on Snow Mold. Donna M. Boyle. McCauley News. Volume 32, Number 3. April 2011. http://bmcnews.org/story/the-lowdown-on-snow-mold. Accessed August 1, 2018. 
 

4. AAFA. Mold Allergy. http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=8&sub=16&cont=58. Updated in 2005. Accessed on August 1, 2018.

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