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Allergies

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Allergy Relief at the Source

GET ALLERGY RELIEF AT THE SOURCE:
WHEN AND WHERE YOU NEED IT

Pollen entering nose icon

THIS ALLERGIC REACTION STARTS IN YOUR NOSE

At times, we all naturally breathe in allergens like pollen, pet dander, dust, and mold.
And, since the nose is the natural filtering system and gateway for the lungs. it's the
first place that experiences the results of these allergy triggers.1

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AN "ALLERGIC CASCADE" CAUSES NASAL SYMPTOMS

When you inhale allergy triggers, your body overreacts by producing six key
inflammatory substances—histamine, prostaglandins, cytokines, tryptases,
chemokines, and leukotienes.* These substances work together to create what's
called an “allergic cascade," causing a chain of symptoms like nasal congestion,
runny nose and itchy, watery eyes.2

* The exact number and precise mechanism are unknown. 

Allergy relief pill icon

ALLERGY PILLS TRAVEL THE BODY TO BLOCK 1 SUBSTANCE*

Allergy pills only act on one of the substances that cause symptoms in your
body—histamine.** And pills have to travel through your entire
body in order to take effect. FLONASE® Allergy Relief helps block
6 allergic substances.

** Mechanism vs. most OTC allergy pills. Flonase acts o multiple inflammatory substances (histamine, prostaglandins, cytokines, trptases, chemokines and leukotrienes). The exact number and precise mechanism are unkonwn 

Nasal Spray Bottle icon

FLONASE® ALLERGY RELIEF WORKS AT THE SOURCE TO
BLOCK 6 SUBSTANCES*

The active ingredient in FLONASE® Allergy Relief, fluticasone propionate, is a glucocorticoid. Glucocorticoids are substances produced naturally by your body to help fight inflammation. Because FLONASE® is delivered by a spray directly in the nose, barely any of it travels through your body or gets into your blood stream.

Sources:

1. Stuart I. Henochowicz, MD. (2014). MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. Web. Available at
http://www.nIm-nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000813.hlm.  14 Dec. 2014.
2. Stone KD, Pmssin C, Metcalfe DD. lgE, mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils. J Allergy Clin Irrmmol 2010; 125(2): 73-80