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Living with Cat Allergies

CAT ON THE PROWL? TIPS FOR LIVING WITH CAT ALLERGIES

Living with cat allergies can be tough, especially when your partner owns a cat that he or she adores. Pet allergy symptoms occur when sufferers are exposed to pet dander (flecks of dead skin and hair).1 To avoid losing your cool when it comes to your allergy symptoms, here are some tips to help you cope with your partner’s fluffy friend.

AVOID CARPET AND UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE

Cat dander has a tendency to get everywhere–so limiting the potential surface area where cat hair can easily latch on to is key for minimizing cat allergy symptoms. When possible, sit on wooden furniture, which doesn’t trap as much cat dander on its surface.2

CREATE CAT-FREE ZONES

Certain areas in the house should be designated as cat-free zones, including the bedroom. There’s nothing worse than trying to go to sleep, only to be attacked by a sneezing fit due to cat dander in the air. Limit the areas your partner’s cat can roam to give yourself some sneeze-free spaces.

MINIMIZE SHEDDING AND CAT DANDER

To have the least possible exposure to cat allergens, you should also aim to minimize the cat’s shedding and dry skin. Some methods to lessen this shedding include feeding the cat a healthy diet of balanced nutrients, as well as frequent grooming.3

USE AN AIR FILTERING SYSTEM

HEPA air purifiers help clean the air from indoor allergens, including pet dander, dust, and mold.4 If your partner does not own an air purifier, it might be beneficial to look into one for the bedroom so that you can reduce cat allergens while sleeping.

USE FLONASE® ALLERGY RELIEF NASAL SPRAY 

FLONASE® Allergy Relief Nasal Spray can help relieve allergy symptoms. It blocks 6 different allergic substances instead of 1.** If you can’t fully avoid your partner’s cat, at least you can relieve the symptoms you experience as a result of that exposure!

**Mechanism vs. most over-the-counter (OTC) allergy pills. FLONASE® acts on multiple inflammatory substances (histamine, prostaglandins, cytokines, tryptases, chemokines and leukotrienes). The exact number and precise mechanism are unknown.

Sources:

1. AAAAI. Pet Allergy. http://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/allergies/pet-allergy.aspx. Accessed April 28, 2015.

2. American Lung Association. Pet Dander. http://www.lung.org/healthy-air/home/resources/pet-dander-1.html. Accessed April 28, 2015.

3. ASPCA. Shedding. https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/shedding. Accessed April 28, 2015.

4. AAFA. Indoor Air Quality and Allergies. https://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=24&cont=344. Accessed May 5, 2015.