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SMART New Year's Resolutions

RESOLVING TO MANAGE YOUR ALLERGIES? HERE ARE A FEW “SMART” TIPS.

If you’re making a New Year’s resolution this year, you’re not alone — nearly half of all adult Americans will be joining you.1 But the number of people that typically follow through is much lower: last year, only 8% actually achieved their goals.2

There’s a simple way to help yourself realize your good intentions for the new year. Make sure your resolutions are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

The SMART method has been used in businesses to help employees set more meaningful and useful work goals3 and can be just as useful in our personal lives as well. The SMART method can help you avoid vague or general goals, and replace them with specific, measurable tasks that you’ll find easier to accomplish every day.

WHAT DO “SMART” ALLERGY RESOLUTIONS LOOK LIKE?

Allergies and Relaxation

Set your own SMART resolutions that feel easy to measure and actually follow through on them throughout the year. In time, you may be surprised by how much these smaller steps actually add up to big changes−for your allergies and your life.

Sources:

  1. Marist Poll. 2013. Turning Over a New Leaf in 2014? Available at:
    http://maristpoll.marist.edu/1223turning-over-a-new-leaf-in-2014/. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  2. New Years Resolutions Statistics. University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology. 2014.
    Quoted on Statistics Brain web site. Available at www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics.
    Accessed December 3, 2014.
  3. MIT. 2014. Performance Development SMART Goals. Available at:
    http://hrweb.mit.edu/performance-development/goal-setting-developmental-planning/smart-goals. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  4. NCBI. 2012. Stress and Allergic Diseases. Available at: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3264048/.
    Accessed December 3, 2014.
  5. National Institute of Environmental Health Services. 2014. Pollen. Available at:
    http://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/conditions/asthma/allergens/pollen/index.cfm. Accessed December 1, 14.
  6. NCBI. 2010. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and bronchial inflammation in grass pollen allergy after allergen challenge.
    Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20637584. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  7. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. Reducing Allergens in the Home A Room-by-Room Guide. Available at:
    http://msdh.ms.gov/msdhsite/_static/resources/2111.pdf. Accessed December 3, 2014.