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ALLERGY SYMPTOMS AT LARGE:  WHAT IT MEANS TO HAVE ALLERGIES

 

COMMON ALLERGY SYMPTOMS AND HOW TO TREAT THEM

The term “nasal allergies” refers to a group of common allergy symptoms that develop when you’re exposed to allergens like dust, pollen, and animal dander. As the name suggests, nasal allergies begin in your nose, but the symptoms don’t end there.1 Here are a few for starters:

  • NOSE-RELATED SYMPTOMS

    NASAL CONGESTION:

    When you breathe in an allergen, your immune system responds by releasing chemicals—also called “allergic substances”—that create inflammation in your nose. This inflammation opens the blood vessels in the lining of your nose and causes swelling and congestion. You may experience trouble breathing—especially when you’re lying down.2,3  Congestion from allergies is often one of the first symptoms to appear once exposed to an allergen.4

    RUNNY NOSE:

    It’s normal for your nose to produce a thin, clear liquid called mucus. But when you’re exposed to an allergen and your nose becomes irritated from inflammation, mucus production increases and results in a runny nose.5

    SNEEZING:

    This sudden, forceful burst of air from your nose and mouth is another common allergy symptom. Also called “sternutation,” sneezing is your body’s way of removing an irritant from your nose. While repeated sneezing can be annoying, it’s hardly ever a sign of a serious health problem.6,7

    ITCHY NOSE:

    An itch on any part of your body can be annoying, but the itchy nose that accompanies other nasal allergy symptoms can be especially distracting—and difficult to scratch!8

  • EYE-RELATED SYMPTOMS

    ITCHY EYES:

    When you think of nasal allergies, eye symptoms don’t immediately come to mind. In fact, many people who seek help for their nasal symptoms tend to ignore their eye-related symptoms. But itchy eyes from allergies can be a major source of discomfort when allergy season hits.9

    WATERY EYES:

    Unfortunately, the same immune system reaction that creates inflammation in your nose can also make the tiny blood vessels in your eyes leak, leaving you with eyes that are watery as well as itchy.9

 

TREATMENT

Get 24-hour relief from your nose- and eye-related allergy symptoms. Experts say that anti-inflammatory nasal sprays containing corticosteroids—a type of medicine approved by the FDA to treat nasal allergy symptoms—are the most effective form of relief for nasal allergy symptoms.10

FLONASE® Allergy Relief is a corticosteroid nasal spray that contains what—until going over-the-counter—has been the #1 most prescribed allergy medicine.* And FLONASE® is the first and only nasal allergy spray indicated to provide 24-hour relief of both nose- and eye-related allergy symptoms.

So if itchy, watery eyes are a problem for you during spring allergy season, FLONASE® can provide you with relief. Want to see how FLONASE® provides 24-hour relief? Watch this video.

* Based on IMS Health Monthly TRx Allergy Market. 12-month period ending May, 2014

 

Sources:

1. Medline Plus. Allergic rhinitis. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000813.htm. Accessed March 11, 2015.

2. NIAID Health Info. Airborne Allergens. http://www.allergywatch.org/basic/airborne_allergens.pdf. Accessed March 11, 2015.

3. Medline Plus. Stuffy or runny nose – adult. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003049.htm. Accessed March 11, 2015.

4. ACAAI. Allergy Rhinitis. http://acaai.org/allergies/types/hay-fever-rhinitis. Accessed March 11, 2015.

5. AAFA. Rhinitis and Sinusitis. http://www.aafa.org/print.cfm?id=9&sub=18&cont=239. Accessed March 11, 2015.

6. KidsHealth. What Makes Me Sneeze? http://kidshealth.org/kid/talk/qa/sneeze.html. Accessed March 11, 2015.

7. Medline Plus. Sneezing. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003060.htm. Accessed March 11, 2015.

8. Medline Plus. Itching. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003217.htm. Accessed March 11, 2015.

9. ACAAI. Eye Allergy. http://acaai.org/allergies/types/eye-allergies. Accessed March 11, 2015.

10. AAFP. Allergies: Controlling Your Symptoms. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0301/p620.html. Accessed March 11, 2015.