UNDERSTANDING

ALLERGIES

Be greater than your allergies

 

DIFFERENT TYPES OF ALLERGENS

 

People are affected by all kinds of allergens. Some of us need to avoid pollen and dust; others can’t be around dogs or cats. But no matter what you’re allergic to, allergy symptoms can interfere with daily activities and reduce your quality of life.

AIRBORNE ALLERGENS

You can’t see them or smell them, but airborne allergens—like pollen, dust, pet dander, and mold—are the source of more allergic reactions than any other type of allergen worldwide. In the United States alone, more than 50 million Americans struggle with upper respiratory tract symptoms that are allergic reactions to airborne allergens.1 These symptoms include nasal congestion, sneezing, runny nose, itchy nose, and itchy, watery eyes.2

People are affected by all kinds of allergens. Some of us need to avoid pollen and dust; others can’t be around dogs or cats. But no matter what you’re allergic to, allergy symptoms can interfere with daily activities and reduce your quality of life.

AIRBORNE ALLERGENS

You can’t see them or smell them, but airborne allergens—like pollen, dust, pet dander, and mold—are the source of more allergic reactions than any other type of allergen worldwide. In the United States alone, more than 50 million Americans struggle with upper respiratory tract symptoms that are allergic reactions to airborne allergens.1 These symptoms include nasal congestion, sneezing, runny nose, itchy nose, and itchy, watery eyes.2

SOURCES:

1. Allergy Facts. ACAAI website. http://acaai.org/news/facts-statistics/allergies. Accessed August 2015.

2. US Department of Health and Human Services. Airborne allergens: something in the air. http://www.allergywatch.org/basic/airborne_allergens.pdf. Accessed February 20. 2015.

SOURCES:

1. Allergy Facts. ACAAI website. http://acaai.org/news/facts-statistics/allergies. Accessed August 2015.

2. US Department of Health and Human Services. Airborne allergens: something in the air. http://www.allergywatch.org/basic/airborne_allergens.pdf. Accessed February 20. 2015.