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Be greater than your allergies

Be greater than your allergies

PUT YOUR ALLERGY IQ TO THE TEST

Provided by The Weather Channel

How much do you really know about allergies? Take this quiz to put your knowledge to the test.

Image courtesy of Thinkstock

FALSE!

Dr. Sublett believes this is one of the most common misconceptions about pollen and allergies.

“Most of the country actually sees tree pollen come out about mid-February, even with the cold weather, that’s just how they come out,” he told weather.com “You generally have two peaks with tree pollen: one in March and one in April. And then the grass [pollens] come out in late April and early May, and in some places, around Memorial Day and through July. If you add that all up, the spring season is generally about five months.”

And all of this is to say nothing of fall pollen allergies. Fall allergies last “from when ragweed enters the air, [in] late August and early September, until there’s frost on the ground,” said Dr. Purvi Parikh, allergist at Allergy and Asthma Associates of Murray Hill.

But wind isn’t the only factor when it comes to pollen. “Rain tends to temporarily rinse them out,” he said. “So even though they may be released at certain times
of the day, I’m not sure if that’s critical for an individual as far as trying to
avoid pollen.” 

Image courtesy of Thinkstock

Image courtesy of Thinkstock

FALSE!

Dr. Sublett believes this is one of the most common misconceptions about pollen and allergies.

“Most of the country actually sees tree pollen come out about mid-February, even with the cold weather, that’s just how they come out,” he told weather.com “You generally have two peaks with tree pollen: one in March and one in April. And then the grass [pollens] come out in late April and early May, and in some places, around Memorial Day and through July. If you add that all up, the spring season is generally about five months.”

And all of this is to say nothing of fall pollen allergies. Fall allergies last “from when ragweed enters the air, [in] late August and early September, until there’s frost on the ground,” said Dr. Purvi Parikh, allergist at Allergy and Asthma Associates of Murray Hill.

But wind isn’t the only factor when it comes to pollen. “Rain tends to temporarily rinse them out,” he said. “So even though they may be released at certain times of the day, I’m not sure if that’s critical for an individual as far as trying to avoid pollen.” 

Image courtesy of Thinkstock